Posts tagged ‘Jane Fonda’

April 11, 2013

Who Needs to Get a Life, Hanoi Jane?

by lewwaters

Jane Fonda, aka ‘Hanoi’ Jane Fonda for her treasonous exploits offering aid and comfort to our enemy at a time we had Troops in harm’s way doesn’t seem to like that so many Vietnam Vets still despise her. Part of why was stated in Hanoi Jane, It Wasn’t a ‘Mistake,’ It Was Treason

She clings to the canard that all she did wrong was succumb to the moment, posing for a very inflammatory set of photos of her sitting at an anti-aircraft gun. The below video should explain why her actions are considered “treasonous” by us and that it goes much further than those photos.

She expressed “regret” for the photo, but stands by her other actions and today, claims, “I have never done anything to hurt my country or the men and women who have fought and continue to fight for us.”

And now, she says that we need to “get a life?”

 

April 7, 2013

Hanoi Jane, It Wasn’t a ‘Mistake,’ It Was Treason

by lewwaters

Jane Fonda MugshotTREASON: The betrayal of one’s own country by waging war against it or by consciously or purposely acting to aid its enemies.

Hanoi Jane Fonda is at it again. She just can’t shut up and fade away to the cesspool of herself. And as expected, being a leftist loon, she plays the victim over her treasonous activities long ago during the Vietnam War.

In her latest rant she cries, “I Will Go to My Grave with Unforgivable Mistake,” the “mistake” being the infamous photo of her sitting at an enemy anti-aircraft gun in North Vietnam taken during her 1972 visit to the communist nation while our Troops were engaged in war against the Communist North Vietnamese.

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July 17, 2011

Cry Me a River Hanoi Jane. Still Blaming Vietnam Veterans?

by lewwaters

Not exactly how I like to begin a Sunday morning, but in reading today’s emails I ran across Jane Fonda: QVC axed my appearance over politics wherein the dried up old prune, Jane Fonda, aka Hanoi Jane for her anti-war activities and stabbing Vietnam Veterans in back is upset over QVC cancelling her appearance to hawk her book, Prime Time.

The fiery supporter of communism years ago, who has made several Millions of Dollars through the capitalist system she condemned now claims, “this has gone on far too long, this spreading of lies about me! None of it is true. NONE OF IT!” on her personal blogsite.

She further claims, “I love my country. I have never done anything to hurt my country or the men and women who have fought and continue to fight for us” and “Most people don’t buy into the far right lies.”

Really, Jane? Far right? It’s been Vietnam Veterans, the very ones you now say you never did anything against that have been holding you accountable all of these decades. We are nothing more than far right liars in your book?

Well, screw you, you dried up old lying bitch! We remember well what you did, when you did it and how it affected us. We recall your activities in enticing soldiers to desert. We recall your ill fated and major flop of a movie, FTA.

We’re well aware of the email circulated years ago peppered with lies in order to discredit the truths about your treasonous activities.

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March 31, 2011

Hanoi Jane Celebrated Shooting Down of B-52’s by Communist North Vietnamese

by lewwaters

If ever anyone wonder why so many of us Vietnam Veterans still harbor ill will against this woman, a excerpt from a speech given sometime in the early 1970’s at U.C. Berkeley where students in attendance applaud her claim of 34 American B-52’s being shot down by the Communist North Vietnamese. That is a potential of 170 American Servicemen killed.

November 13, 2009

Troops Need Reinforcements, Not Another Memorial

by lewwaters

Vietnam MemorialTwenty-seven years ago, November 13, 1982, the Viet Nam Memorial was dedicated in Washington D.C. In remembrance of the day, my friend Rees Lloyd sent me the days American Minute, written by William Federer,

The Vietnam War Memorial was dedicated NOVEMBER 13, 1982, honoring 58,000 American troops who died.

U.S. forces inflicted over a million enemy fatalities, yet politicians did not allow a victory.

A former Communist North Vietnamese colonel, Bui Tin, called the American “peace movement” essential: “Every day our leadership would listen to the world news over the radio to follow the growth of the American anti-war movement. Visits to Hanoi by people like Jane Fonda and former Attorney General Ramsey Clark gave us confidence that we should hold on in the face of battlefield reverses.”

On October 12, 1967, during Operation Medina, Marine Sergeant George Hutchings of Charlie Company, 1st Battalion, 1st Marine Division, had a dozen men killed around him when ambushed by North Vietnamese in the Hai Lang jungle.

Months later, after numerous battles, George was shot three times, bayoneted and left for dead.

He survived and was later awarded the Purple Heart.

Of the Vietnam Memorial, George Hutchings said: “On that wall is the name of Corporal Quinton Bice, who was hit in the chest with a rocket running a patrol in my place.

A Christian, he had shared the Gospel with me, but I didn’t understand it till he gave his life in my place.”

Very touching and I thank both William Federer of American Minute and my friend Rees for sending it to me.

While not every one who served in that war came away with such understanding, as did George Hutchings, most us came away with a deeper appreciation of freedom and liberty and what it costs to keep. The phrase, “You have never lived until you have almost died, for those who have fought for it, life has a special flavor the protected will never know,” has a special meaning to us others cannot fathom.

DSC03947DSC03944

The two names shown above hold special meaning to me, as they were two of the 13 from my unit who lost their lives during my time in Viet Nam.

Scott Stanton died, September 8, 1969 from wounds received 4 days earlier, September 4. Everyone felt he was going to survive as he was upbeat and in good spirits. He died in his sleep while on the medevac flight to Japan.

Robert Pilk died instantly July 19, 1970 of wounds he received from enemy fire. The helicopter he was riding in crashed with my best buddy, Ron Strickland sitting in the front seat. Ron survived, but medevaced out to Japan before I was able to see him in the hospital.

I mention them as a reminder, just like George Hutchings above, that war is very personal to those of us who serve and those names etched into granite were real people who are the heroes of every conflict.

They meant something to their Families, loved ones and us.

It is also why we take denigration and destruction of our memorials so personal.

Currently, we are in another war that the anti-war left has succeeded in turning public opinion away from almost as much as they did back during Viet Nam.

We have a leader who cannot, or will not, make any decision on reinforcements for our Troops requested by General Stanley McChrystal back in August!

Most distressing is that we also have one, who was once one of our number, repeating his treasonous acts in undermining the Troops as he did back in 1971.

John Kerry likes to stand before our memorials and make grand speeches, but he knows nothing about honor or heroes, allowing him self to be called a “war hero” after 4 months service and obtaining a chest full of medals used to further his political ambitions that he should not be entitled to wear.

In a 1985 interview he was asked, “What exactly makes a hero?” “Basically, you don’t get killed,” he replied.

As William Federer noted above, there are over 58,000 names of heroes etched in stone on the Viet Nam Veterans Memorial. Nearly three quarters of those names are from after the failed North Vietnamese Tet of 1968 Offensive.

Colonel Bui Tin, disillusioned with the communist takeover, defected and moved to Paris, France, where he gave the interview quoted from above. In addition to the above, in reply to the question “How could American have won the war,” he replied, “Cut the Ho Chi Minh trail inside Laos. If Johnson had granted [Gen. William] Westmoreland’s requests to enter Laos and block the Ho Chi Minh trail, Hanoi could not have won the war.” Later in the interview, he admitted, “Then Johnson had rejected Westmoreland’s request for 200,000 more troops. We realized that America had made its maximum military commitment to the war,” allowing them to just wait us out.

Sound familiar yet?

Tin continues, “We had the impression that American commanders had their hands tied by political factors. Your generals could never deploy a maximum force for greatest military effect.”

Barack Obama is repeating the mistakes of Lyndon Johnson, but unlike Viet Nam, victory in Iraq and Afghanistan does hold importance for the United States.

Barack Obama campaigned on “I will listen to the generals.” So far, he isn’t. He listens more to opportunists like Kerry it seems.

We will build more Memorials to our fallen and those that come back home, we always do. It is the least we can do for those who show the greatest love of fellow man.

Mr. Obama, keep your word. Listen to the Generals, support and back our Troops. Help us keep from having so many names on this next memorial.

July 18, 2009

Walter Cronkite: Only The Good Die Young

by lewwaters

waltercronkitevietnam Walter Cronkite, long-time news reporter and anchorman for CBS News has died at the age of 92.

Labeled by many as “iconic” and “the most trusted man in America,” I cannot share that view of this man. Like Debbie Schlussel, I have no tears to shed for a man who held the responsibility of responsibly and honestly reporting the news to America, deliberately gave a false view of our involvement in the nation of Viet Nam during the 1960’s.

Much of America listened every evening to the man they trusted and never suspected that he was beginning the very biased news against America that helped lead America down the path of the communist nation we are now becoming.

In the Viet Nam War, many seemed to be surprised by the sudden attacks across the nation in the Tet of 68 offensive. Even though our intelligence was at best sketchy, American and South Vietnamese were not caught totally off guard and the offensive launched by the North Vietnamese Communist ended up a huge failure for the Communist North Militarily. Their numbers were decimated and it took many years for them to recover and launch the final drive South, defeating the South Vietnamese who no longer received any aid from America due to Democrat congressional policies.

In many regards the Tet of 68 Offensive was very similar to Germany’s Battle of the Bulge in World War Two, a desperate attempt.

It is ironic that Cronkite reported on both battles of desperation, accurately reporting the Bravery and steadfastness of World War Troops who pushed back the Nazi’s, but labeling our decisive victory in Tet as a “stalemate” and “unwinnable” in a broadcast aired on February 27, 1968 upon his return to America from Viet Nam and ending that broadcast with,

it is increasingly clear to this reporter that the only rational way out then will be to negotiate, not as victors, but as an honorable people who lived up to their pledge to defend democracy, and did the best they could.”

Abandoning a struggling ally is hardly “the best they could do,” as millions of Asians in Viet Nam, Cambodia and Laos paid with their lives as Communism spread across Southeast Asia and untold thousands more lost their lives as they desperately tried escaping the throes of Communism in rickety boats across the South China Sea in what was labeled the Boat People.

In an October 2000 speech, retired General Fredrick Weyand, who commanded II Field Force during the Tet of 68 offensive said in part,

After Tet, General Westmoreland sent Walter Cronkite out to interview me. I was in Command of the Forces in the South around Saigon and below and I was proud of what we’d done. We had done a good job there. So, Walter came down and he spent about an hour and a half interviewing me. And when we got done, he said, “well you’ve got a fine story. But I’m not going to use any of it because I’ve been up to Hue. I’ve seen the thousands of bodies up there in mass graves and I’m determined to do all in my power to bring this war to an end as soon as possible.”

It didn’t seem to matter that those thousands of bodies were of South Vietnamese citizens who had been killed by the Hanoi soldiers and Walter wasn’t alone in this because I think many in the media mirrored his view…”

When I was in Paris at the Peace Talks, it was the most frustrating assignment I think I ever had. Sitting in that conference, week after week listening to the Hanoi negotiators, Le Duc Tho and his friends lecture us. Reading from the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Herald Tribune, the Atlanta Constitution, NBC, CBS, you name it. Their message was always the same. “Hey, read your newspapers, listen to your TV. The American people want you out of Vietnam. Now, why don’t you just go ahead and get out?” So finally a Peace Agreement was signed that everyone knew would be violated and with no recourse or hope of enforcement on our part.”

General Weyand went on to say he doesn’t blame the media entirely for the outcome of the war, but Cronkite’s words expressing how he had no intention of reporting the Battle truthfully evidence how the media spearheaded the anti-war effort at turning public opinion against the effort to keep the South Vietnamese free and towards supporting the Communist Forces of the North.

In short, he sold out America and our Troops as well as millions of Southeast Asians.

In the days ahead many will label Cronkite as “iconic,” “legendary,” and heap accolades upon him I feel are undeserved. Cronkite himself called what he said on Vietnam as his “proudest achievement.”

It escapes me how having the blood of millions of people, over 40,000 of which are American Soldiers on your hands could be seen as his “proudest achievement.”

Uncle Walt, as he was affectionately known, is gone. Dead at the age of 92 and who lived much longer than many of my brothers whose blood is on his hands that he sold out. His death at this ripe old age reinforces the old adage, “only the good die young.”

I have no tears for the man but offer condolences to his family and loved ones.

Others who sold out the Vietnamese and American Troops will join him one day. Jane Fonda, John Kerry, Ramsey Clark, Bill Ayers and so many others who today lavish themselves with the very luxuries they called for others to scorn as they spoke out against a free Viet Nam will also face the grim reaper in time.

Just as I hope and pray for Walter Cronkite, they too should face every single one of those well more than 40,000 American Troops their anti-American conduct helped kill on their descent to hell!