Posts tagged ‘Veterans Memorials’

March 30, 2013

Easter Services at the Resurrected Mojave Veterans Memorial Cross

by lewwaters

mojave-cross-photo02Shortly after the end of World War One, a small group of Veterans erected a plain, simple cross in the middle of the vast expanse of the Mojave Desert, far away from civilization to honor their fallen brethren.

The wooden cross erected in what was open land in 1934, sat silently in the desert, subjected to the weather, occasional vandals but maintained by those Veterans and later by friends of the Veterans.

The land was made part of a Federal Reserve in 1994 and due to deterioration of the original wooden cross, caretakers replaced it with a metal cross, somehow enraging a park ranger, Frank Buono who waited until he retired on a comfortable taxpayer paid pension, to seek the assistance of the ACLU to file a lawsuit to have it removed.

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July 19, 2012

From Sea to Shining Sea, Veterans Memorials Continue Under Assault

by lewwaters

War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. The decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks that nothing is worth war is much worse. The person who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing which is more important than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature and has no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself.” – John Stuart Mill English economist & philosopher (1806 – 1873)

War is indeed an ugly thing and those who are sent to one pay a steep price, some paying the ultimate sacrifice by giving their lives. We are known for giving honors and respects to those who fall in battle protecting our country and erect Memorials to honor the fallen across the land

It wasn’t always like that, though. Prior to World War One, few Memorials existed in the world and of those erected, such Memorials like The Arc de Triomphe in Paris or Nelson’s Column in London bore no names, the war dead often just shoveled into mass unmarked graves.

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